Thanksgiving Joys: (almost) Wordless Wednesday – Vintage Postcards #4

This series digitizes a set of postcards collected by my grandfather Donald C. Minor from 1906-1910. Born in Greene County, Pennsylvania in 1902, Donald was the youngest son, youngest grandson and youngest cousin of the Francis Marion and Mary Jane Gwynn Minor clan.  His parents, Robert and May Stephenson Minor, sent cards from their travels; his older sister, Helen, sent cards while she was attending school in nearby Waynesburg; aunts, uncles, cousins, and friends sent photocards and holiday greetings from all over the United States with great regularity.  The resulting Postcard Collection is both a family puzzle and a cultural window to the world of Donald Minor during the first decade of the twentieth century.

Thanksgiving Series No. 7

The scan hardly does this beautiful card justice.  The pumpkin and its vine are both embossed and outlined in reflective gold, accentuating the impression that the vine is in front of the fence.  The Eastern Wild Turkey is also embossed, though less so than the pumpkin, and is accurately illustrating this species – its face flushed blue from excitement, the beak’s long fleshy snood and throat’s wattle a brilliant red.  Finally, flat with no embossing, a lane leads from the turkey to a distant farmhouse.  Such depth of field!

Thanksgiving Joys were sent from Waynesburg, Pennsylvania to eight year old Donald by his sister, Helen,  on 22 November 1910 :

This turkey looks as if it would make a pretty good Thanksgiving dinner.  Don’t you think.  How are you?  Bye! Bye!  Helen

Thanksgiving Greetings: (almost) Wordless Wednesday – Vintage Postcard #3

This series digitizes a set of postcards collected by my grandfather Donald C. Minor from 1906-1910. Born in Greene County, Pennsylvania in 1902, Donald was the youngest son, youngest grandson and youngest cousin of the Francis Marion and Mary Jane Gwynn Minor clan.  His parents, Robert and May Stephenson Minor, sent cards from their travels; his older sister, Helen, sent cards while she was attending school in nearby Waynesburg; aunts, uncles, cousins, and friends sent photocards and holiday greetings from all over the United States with great regularity.  The resulting Postcard Collection is both a family puzzle and a cultural window to the world of Donald Minor during the first decade of the twentieth century.

“Hello, Donal,” says Ralph of South Connellsville, Pennsylvania.  “How are you.  I am well and go to school nearly every day.”  Ralph set down his Thanksgiving greetings in late November 1909, perhaps as a way of practicing his cursive.

The card he selected was printed in Germany, with the attention to detail and use of deep colors a collector comes to expect of German cards.  The trademark is an unfamiliar girl at the mailbox illustration; this greeting appears to be #2140 in a series.
On the front, a traditional Eastern Wild Turkey is pictured in front of a patriotic banner.  The embossed gold oval frames a still life of fruit and flowers.  The white lilies were considered symbols of majesty and honor, while strawberries were meant to recall the sweetness in life and character.

Bringing in the Turkeys: (almost) Wordless Wednesday – Vintage Postcard #2

This series digitizes a set of postcards collected by my grandfather Donald C. Minor from 1906-1910. Born in Greene County, Pennsylvania in 1902, Donald was the youngest son, youngest grandson and youngest cousin of the Francis Marion and Mary Jane Gwynn Minor clan.  His parents, Robert and May Stephenson Minor, sent cards from their travels; his older sister, Helen, sent cards while she was attending school in nearby Waynesburg; aunts, uncles, cousins, and friends sent photocards and holiday greetings from all over the United States with great regularity.  The resulting Postcard Collection is both a family puzzle and a cultural window to the world of Donald Minor during the first decade of the twentieth century.

Postmarked Tama, Iowa, November 22, 1910

 Aunt Sarah Minor Herrington McClure sent this Thanksgiving greeting to eight year old Donald while visiting her daughter, Beatrice Jane Herrington, in Tama, Iowa.

Donald you would lik (sic) the baby here I no (sic) he will let you do most anything for him.  your Aunt Sarah 

The card itself is not very fancy.  The image is off centered and the illustration fuzzy.  I can not find a printer trademark or an indication of who contracted its publication.  Nonetheless I find this picture charming.  A farmer’s child is dressed for the holiday, sporting a patriotic neckerchief.  Walking down the path toward us, his company, the boy is distracted.  He better watch his cornbread or that pair of Eastern Wild Turkeys will take it straight away!!

Postmarked Tama, Iowa, November 22, 1910

Top Hat on the Turkey: A Vintage Postcard for Wordless Wednesday

In keeping with the tradition begun by Abraham Lincoln in 1863, President Theodore Roosevelt issued a Thanksgiving Proclamation in October 1908:

“Once again the season is at hand, when according to the ancient custom of our people, it becomes the duty of the President to appoint a day of prayer and thanksgiving to God.

. . . .Upon material well-being as a foundation must be raised the lofty life of the spirit, if this nation is to properly fulfill its great mission and to accomplish all that we so ardently hope and desire.  The things of the body are good; the thing of the intellect better; but best of all are the things of the soul; for in the nation as in the individual, in the long run it is character that counts. Let us therefore as a people set our faces resolutely against evil, and with broad charity, with kindness and goodwill toward all men, but with unflinching determination to smile down wrong, strive with all the strength that is given us for righteousness in public and in private life.

Now, therefore, I, Theodore Roosevelt,  President of the United States, set apart Thursday the 26th day of November next as a day of general thanksgiving and prayer, and on that day I recommend that the people shall cease from their daily work, and in their homes or in their churches, meet devoutly to thank the Almighty for the many and great blessings they have received in the past, and to pray that they may be given strength so to order their lives as to reserve a continuation of these blessings in the future.”

This turkey donned a patriotic top hat and set out to wish six year old Donald C. Minor a Happy Thanksgiving.  Aunt Sarah Minor McClure attached a one cent stamp and sent the German-made card to R.F. D. 1, Carmichaels, Pennsylvania on November 3, 1908.   She signed the back “From Aunt Sarah”; the date 11-24-’08 was added later by another hand.

This card is the first in a series of Thanksgiving Vintage Postcards.

 

 

 

Wordless Wednesday: Waynesburg M. E. Church 1907

Wordless Wednesday is an ongoing blog-prompt hosted at Geneabloggers.  The author frequently uses the opportunity to share the vintage postcard collection of her grandfather, Donald C. Minor.

Today’s visitor to 112 North Richhill Street, Waynesburg, Pennyslvania would come upon this beautiful old church:

 

One hundred years ago the corner looked like this:

From the postcard collection of Donald C. Minor

How many differences can you spot!

  • The NAME:  In or around 1968 the Waynesburg Methodist Episcopal Church became affiliated with the newly created United Methodist Church, and was afterward known as the First Methodist Church of Waynesburg.
  • The parsonage porch is brown.
  • There is no ramp leading through the front arches.
  • There is no stop sign at the corner.
  • The trees are different.
  • There are no electrical lines.
:)

This second image is an artochrome postcard from the Donald C. Minor Postcard Collection, a treasure trove of images and notes sent to my grandfather from 1907-1910.  The card was printed in Germany, as were most of the postcards of that era.  The publisher, however, was more local.  Olmstead Brothers Company Publishers were located in nearby Wheeling, West Virginia.  Either the printer or the publisher identified the card as being #1035, one of a set that showed scenes of the region.*  Unfortunately for Minor genealogists, no note explains why Walter sent this card to five year old Donald on October 21, 1908.

*You can find more photo postcards of the Wheeling, West Virginia region at http://wheeling.weirton.lib.wv.us/history/photos/postcards/index.htm.