When Negatives Are A Positive

People may call me a hoarder, a sentimentalist, a pack rat. But I prefer to think of myself as a Keeper of the Lore, continuing the work of my brilliant ancestors who kept receipts, photographs, letters, cards, documents, books, and negatives.  

YES, NEGATIVES ARE A POSITIVE

Today, I felt like fossicking through my closet  family archives, and was rewarded with the discovery of 1950s negatives, treasured by father.  Let me demonstrate why a negative is worth a thousand words.

Original Negative, scannedScan the negative, like it was a photo (jpeg) file, and then use your scanner to modify the file before saving it to your computer.

Adjust color for a negative, scanned.Find the tab for adjusting the color of the photo/negative, and INVERT the color.

Inverted Color NegativeLike magic, an image has appeared without chemicals or dark room!!  Save this jpeg file to your computer, and you can spiff it up with a bit of photo editing.  I prefer to use the online service, PicMonkey.com.  Ultimately, I end my morning with this great shot:

Mystery Man from negativeSure, I don’t know this particular dude, but I do know that he was important to my father.  Even the tiniest peek into his past gives me a shiver of connection.

Anyone else have some negatives to share???

Vannoy Joy: 1911

Bedie Harrington Vannoy holding baby Paul, as yet unnamed at the time this photograph was taken in 1911.

Bedie Harrington Vannoy holding baby Paul, as yet unnamed at the time this photograph was taken in 1911.

Bedie Harrington Vannoy was the daughter of Sarah Minor Harrington McClure.  Born in Greene County, Pennsylvania around 1880, Beatrice “Bedie” married John Vannoy in the early part of the 20th century and moved with him to Iowa, where he was a minister.  Bedie kept close touch with her family back home, writing frequently, particularly to Donald Minor, her cousin, born in 1902.

As she had children, Bedie would write postcards to Donald and her grandfather, Francis Marion, who lived with Donald and his parents, Robert and May Minor.  This photograph was one such card, and reads:

Dear Grandpa, We are all well and enjoying a cool wave very much for it has been so awfle (sic) dry and hot here.  This is our new baby.  He has no name yet but weighs 16 lbs.  He is awfle (sic) good and we think him fine.  Janet and Ivon have grown so much this summer.  I hope you are well and enjoying life every day.  I often think of you.  Lovingly your Granddaughter Bedie

If you are a descendant of John and Bedie Vannoy and would like copies of the family portraits within my family archives, please contact me!

dkaysdays at gmail dot com

I’m a Big Brother! : Ivan Vannoy circa 1911

Image

 

Dear Cousin Donald,  You ought to come and see our little baby.  He is just fine.  we have not named him yet. Mabey (sic) you can send him a name.  How is "Great-Grandpa?  We are all fine.  Papa brought ma football from Chicago.  I wish I had a nice yard like you have to play in.  It has just poured down all day so Janet and I have been in the house all day, and it is raining hard this evening. When are you all coming to see us?  Mama said Helo (sic) to your Mama and wants to know how your papa is.  Lovingly your cousin.  Ivan Vannoy

Dear Cousin Donald, You ought to come and see our little baby. He is just fine. we have not named him yet. Mabey (sic) you can send him a name. How is “Great-Grandpa? We are all fine. Papa brought me football from Chicago. I wish I had a nice yard like you have to play in. It has just poured down all day so Janet and I have been in the house all day, and it is raining hard this evening. When are you all coming to see us? Mama said Helo (sic) to your Mama and wants to know how your papa is. Lovingly your cousin. Ivan Vannoy

In 1911, Donald Minor’s cousin, Bedie Harrington Vannoy, had her third child out in Iowa.  The little boy was eventually named Paul, and returned with siblings Ivan and Janet to visit their grandmother, Sarah Minor Harrington McClure, and their great-grandpa, Francis Marion Minor, with whom Donald lived while his father convalesced from migraines in health resorts like the Markleton Sanitorium.

The Tama, Iowa photographer, C. W. Wright, printed the photograph of this six-year-old on postcard stock, and the note accompanied other mail delivered to Ceylon Lane, Garard’s Fort, Pennsylvania.

*Photograph restored using PicMonkey: http://www.picmonkey.com/