Believe You This?

In a letter to brother James dated 10 April 1872, Ira Sayles sent both sympathy and sermon to his ailing 50 year old sibling whose diagnosis of palsy had been shared in a March note. Palsy by definition in the 1870s was a chronic condition involving some sort of paralysis. A person had three alternatives … Continue reading Believe You This?

Peeking Into Ira’s Soul

""Practice any art," Kurt Vonnegut wrote.  "...music, singing, dancing, acting, drawing, painting, sculpting, poetry, fiction, essays, reportage..."Practice any art...no matter how well or badly, not to get money and fame, but to experience becoming, to find out what's inside you, to make your soul grow." Ira Sayles, 1817-1894, practiced art, writing essays and poems throughout … Continue reading Peeking Into Ira’s Soul

Are You My Cousin? : The Legacy of Migrating Minors

How many of us stand on the hopes and dreams of the pioneering Minors?  With yesterday's publishing of the 1872 letter between brothers Samuel and John, I am reasonably certain that I have many unmet cousins in the Midlands and West Coast states of America. Collating the data from the letter, a Thomas Minor Society … Continue reading Are You My Cousin? : The Legacy of Migrating Minors

I Remain Your Loving Brother – Samuel Minor to John P. Minor: Amanuensis Monday

On Mondays, many geneabloggers don the hat of amanuensis, to record and transcribe primary sources within our care.  Today I begin sharing the records of Samuel and Elly Lowery Minor found among the papers of Samuel's brother, my great³ grandfather, John Pearson Minor.   On the 22 September 1872, Samuel Minor of Cedar Rapids, Iowa … Continue reading I Remain Your Loving Brother – Samuel Minor to John P. Minor: Amanuensis Monday