Amanuensis Day: The Last Will and Testament of Happy Stone

North Carolina, wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998 for Happy Stone, Franklin County; accessed digitally on ancestry.com, 20 August 2021. On a Tuesday morning in March three springs before her death, Happy Stone sat with H. H. Davis and Robert Mannas and dictated the terms of what should happen to her farm and estate upon her … Continue reading Amanuensis Day: The Last Will and Testament of Happy Stone

Amanuensis Day: Happy Stone’s Land Goes to the Next Generation

Geographical, Statistical, and Historical Map of North Carolina, 1823; digitally accessed from the UNC library, North Carolina Maps, 18 Aug 2021, (https://dc.lib.unc.edu/cdm/ref/collection/ncmaps/id/178). My 4x great-grandmother, Kerenhappuch "Happy" Stone watched the sun rise from her home on Cypress Creek, Franklin County, North Carolina. Today, as I wait for the sun to peek from behind Storm Fred's … Continue reading Amanuensis Day: Happy Stone’s Land Goes to the Next Generation

Examining the Language of Slavery

During the mid-nineteenth century North Carolina was the global supplier of naval stores. The "Turpentine State" lay in the long-leaf pine belt--a region of dry sandy clay subsoil that ran from North Carolina, south to Florida, and as far west as southern Alabama and Mississippi. The sap of turpentine orchards was harvested and distilled into … Continue reading Examining the Language of Slavery

His Future Was Not Yet Written

Shortly after my father died I began to search for his ancestors, my ancestors. Within a couple of years I had masses of information about Ira Sayles, my dad's mother's grandfather, including a one-line reference in The Alfred (NY) Sun obituary of one George Parker. A little later [George Parker] was brought north by Prof. … Continue reading His Future Was Not Yet Written

The “Lot” of Them: Part Two

AS the country's enumerators set out to collect data for the young nation's seventh federal census, ┬áCongress was once again battling to find a compromise that would settle the slavery agitation once and for all--AND preserve the Union. ┬áBy the fall of 1850, California had been admitted as a free state, Texas had its boundaries … Continue reading The “Lot” of Them: Part Two