Grandma Serena Had A Cat

This week's #family history challenge--What's Your Favorite Discovery--from Amy Johnson Crow's #52Ancestors52Weeks sparked a vivid memory. In mid-January 2009 I discovered first hand what our nation's capital is like in winter. Washington, D.C.'s humid air wraps your body in a vise; a cold breeze off the river increases its grip. I walked briskly from the … Continue reading Grandma Serena Had A Cat

His Future Was Not Yet Written

Shortly after my father died I began to search for his ancestors, my ancestors. Within a couple of years I had masses of information about Ira Sayles, my dad's mother's grandfather, including a one-line reference in The Alfred (NY) Sun obituary of one George Parker. A little later [George Parker] was brought north by Prof. … Continue reading His Future Was Not Yet Written

The Tigerish Glare: part three

Recap The Tigerish Glare: Part One and Part Two On the evening of 29 June 1898, Private Sherman Sayles of the 3rd Missouri Regiment complained of a headache to the night nurse, who notified Camp Alger medical attendant Private Lake. While Lake went to the dispensary to mix some morphine, Private Sayles pulled out a … Continue reading The Tigerish Glare: part three

The Tigerish Glare: part two

Notice of Sherman Sayles' suicide attempt appeared in newspapers throughout the country. It's hard to know if my great-grandfather, Clifton Sayles, subscribed to any of them. He may not have learned of his younger brother's peril until the Chase City, Virginia family was contacted by administrators at St. Elizabeths Hospital, Washington, D.C. Sherman had traveled … Continue reading The Tigerish Glare: part two

Mourning: The Death of Ira Sayles

On Friday morning, the 15th day of June of 1894, in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, Ira Sayles was still but for the shallow movement of his chest. Outside, a mockingbird poured song into the sun-warmed house. His son Clifton and neighbor Joel E. Beales sat bedside by his wife, Serena. Anna, Clifton's wife, and their children, … Continue reading Mourning: The Death of Ira Sayles